Some Of Culpeper's Historic Buildings May Not Survive Earthquake | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Some Of Culpeper's Historic Buildings May Not Survive Earthquake

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Cracks are visible in the fronts and sides of some of Culpeper, Va.'s historic buildings after the 5.8 magnitude earthquake shook the area yesterday.
Jonathan Wilson
Cracks are visible in the fronts and sides of some of Culpeper, Va.'s historic buildings after the 5.8 magnitude earthquake shook the area yesterday.

While much of the D.C. area is back to business as usual today after the earthquake, it's not so easy for those closer to the epicenter. The town of Culpeper, Va., located less than 40 miles north of the quake's epicenter, is facing a pretty hefty cleanup.

Culpeper is usually a pretty quiet town, but residents here say it's even quieter than usual today.

That's because many businesses in the town's historic district remain closed, and the county's public schools are also closed today. In the middle of Culpeper's downtown, you can see facades from late 1800s-era buildings that have cracked free from their structures.

Eight buildings have been condemned after yesterday's earthquake, according to Culpeper spokesman Wally Bunker. At least one historic building, right in the middle of town, will have to be torn down, he adds.

Police have just reopened parts of the two main streets that intersect in downtown Culpeper, but some downtown streets will likely remain closed for a few more days as damage assessments and repairs continue, according to Bunker.

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