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Primaries Shake Up Virginia Politics

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Turnout in Tuesday's Virginia primary elections was low, ranging from 5 percent to 10 percent in some areas.
Michael Pope
Turnout in Tuesday's Virginia primary elections was low, ranging from 5 percent to 10 percent in some areas.

Yesterday's 5.8-magnitude earthquake rattled voters in Virginia as they were headed to the polls Tuesday, and election results may shake things up in Richmond.

Supporters of Virginia Del. Adam Ebbin (D) gathered at Los Tios restaurant in Del Ray, Alexandria to watch election returns Tuesday night.

When it became apparent that Ebbin beat rivals Rob Krupicka and Libby Garvey in the Democratic primary for the 30th state senate district, campaign manager Kirk McPike declared that his candidate created his own earthquake at the polls.

All over Northern Virginia, primary results shook up Virginia politics. Barbara Favola beat Jaime Areizaga-Soto in the primary for the 31st Senate District. Alfonso Lopez beat Stephanie Clifford in the 49th House District.

On the Republican side, Miller Baker beat Scott Martin in the 39th Senate District. Jeff Frederick won against Tito Munoz in the 36th Senate District. Jason Flanary beat Steve Hunt in the 37th Senate District.

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