National Cathedral Significantly Damaged In Earthquake | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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National Cathedral Significantly Damaged In Earthquake

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Three of the four spires from the main tower of the National Cathedral broke off during Tuesday's earthquake. The broken spires are visible on the top of tower in the center of the photo.
Patrick Madden
Three of the four spires from the main tower of the National Cathedral broke off during Tuesday's earthquake. The broken spires are visible on the top of tower in the center of the photo.

Officials at the National Cathedral say early damage estimates from the earthquake could be "millions" of dollars.

All of the pinnacles, gargoyles and stone carvings damaged or destroyed were originals and sculpted by hand.

The dean at the cathedral, Sam Lloyd, says there is no way the cathedral will be to afford these costs and will look to outside funders to pick up the tab.  Lloyd adds it could be years until all of the fixes are made.

The cathedral did not suffer any structural damage during the earthquake. But to be on the safe side, the cathedral will be closed until Sunday.

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