WAMU 88.5 : News

Congress Ready To Back Down U.S. Involvement In Libya

Play associated audio
U.S. lawmakers are seeking ways to support Libya’s transitional government without interfering with the country’s democratic process.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/63921484@N02/5936397916/
U.S. lawmakers are seeking ways to support Libya’s transitional government without interfering with the country’s democratic process.

With the recent gains made by Libyan rebels, lawmakers in the region say the international mission has been justified, but it’s now time to draw down U.S. military involvement in the country.

President Obama received a lot of heat from lawmakers in both parties for his decision to send U.S. planes, bombs and dollars into Libya without congressional approval.

Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) says the recent developments in Tripoli bode well for the president.

"I think the process that's unfolding is one that’s welcome, and I think vindicates President Obama's foreign policy," Connolly says.

With Congress looking to cut trillions of dollars in federal spending, Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) says it's now time to start unwinding NATO’s military mission in the region.

"Clearly the air campaign is no longer needed, as the people of Libya are no longer threatened by the Gaddafi military," says Cardin. "So I think it is time to look at a transition."

Lawmakers in the region are also calling for the U.S. to unfreeze Libyan assets as soon as the transitional government is secure.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the last few years, that has started to change. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.