Georgetown Basketball Team And Chinese Team Attempt To Reconcile After Brawl | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Georgetown Basketball Team And Chinese Team Attempt To Reconcile After Brawl

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A day after getting into a brawl that ended an exhibition game in Beijing, the Georgetown men's basketball team and a Chinese team attempted to bury the hatchet.

The Chinese team, the Bayi Rockets, went to the Beijing airport today to reconcile and see off the departing Hoyas ahead of a rematch Sunday in Shanghai.

A brief statement from Georgetown said head coach John Thompson III and two of the team's players met with representatives of the Rockets, a team owned by China's military.

China's Vice Foreign Minister said Bayi players exchanged souvenirs with the Hoyas. Video footage of Thursday's game showed players punching each other, throwing chairs, and dodging full water bottles thrown by fans.

The contest was marked by physical play on both sides. Following the fight, Thompson pulled his team from the floor and they quickly left the arena. The Hoyas are in China on a 10-day goodwill trip that has been cited by the U.S. State Department as an example of sports diplomacy.

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