Strong Regional Representation In Budget Negotiations May Not Help The Region | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Strong Regional Representation In Budget Negotiations May Not Help The Region

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The region's lawmakers have played key roles in the ongoing congressional budget negotiations, but that doesn’t necessarily mean their states are getting any special perks.

Three Maryland and Virginia lawmakers hold leadership roles in the U.S. House, including Republican Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer.

In the past that would have meant they could steer resources back home, but the Brookings Intuition's William Galston says not anymore.

The overall context now is not one in which goodies are being divided up, it's a context in which pain is being allocated.

Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) was recently named to the newly created special committee charged with finding more than a trillion dollars in budget cuts or revenue increases.

Stan Collander of Qorvis Communications says that role will help Van Hollen’s resume more than his state.

"He's a very forceful advocate and very media centric, telegenic, articulate guy,” says Collander. "My guess is he'll end up being the chief spokesperson for the Democrats."

The joint congressional committee needs to send its budget blueprint to Congress by Thanksgiving.

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