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Art Gallery Introduces Five Emerging Artists To D.C. Scene

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Five local artists are having a coming-out party of sorts, thanks to the Hamiltonian Gallery.

Jenny Mullins is one of five art fellows, picked from almost 300 hopefuls, to receive a two-year-long Hamiltonian Artist mentorship at the gallery. The artists receive professional development training and critiques by local art curators, among other services.

Mullins's past work includes a slot machine sculpture that rates your purity based on how you answer questions. But she won't reveal the purity-rating formula.

"I can't tell you what that is," she says. "State secret. I can tell you, however, that the more money you put in, the better your score will do."

Another fellow, Joshua Wade Smith, invites viewers to try stacking things in their arms really quickly. The items lent by his friends for the Hamiltonian exhibit include a plaster Tom and Jerry piggy bank and a plastic Ninoka camera.

"They'll get to see how these ordinary objects from their lives can be arranged to look like sculpture," he says.

Along with Mullins and Smith, the exhibit features the work of painter Matthew Mann, video artist Sarah Knobel and painter-sculptor Nora Howell. The Hamiltonian Artists will also create four more shows throughout their two-year tenure at the gallery.

With an opening reception on Aug. 13 at 7 p.m., the "New (Now.)" exhibit runs until September 10. The Hamiltonian Gallery is at 1353 U St. N.W.

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