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Advisory Group Debates Plan For Alexandria Waterfront

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City planners have spent months planning out what the waterfront might look like; but the plan still needs approval from council members.
Alexandria Department of Planning and Zoning
City planners have spent months planning out what the waterfront might look like; but the plan still needs approval from council members.

Should the Alexandria waterfront have hotels or parks? That's at the heart of a debate now playing out at City Hall, where members of an advisory panel are expected to issue recommendations Nov. 1.

The work group has conducted only two meetings so far, yet members have set an aggressive time line so the Alexandria City Council would be able to hold a final vote on the waterfront plan in December before the end of the year.

Critics say the existing plan for new hotels and increased density in the area should be abandoned, advocating instead for parks. Supporters of the plan say it will bring new revenue and increased energy to Old Town.

City Council members wanted to vote before their summer recess, but gave up when they couldn't agree. They appointed the advisory group, which is now trying to figure out how much of the existing plan they want to keep and which parts should be abandoned.

At issue is the future of three waterfront sites slated for redevelopment in the near future.

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