WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Program Uses Theater To Promote Drug Abuse Screening

Play associated audio
Actress Debra Winger talks with Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, before heading onstage for the Addiction Performance Project.
Jessica Palombo
Actress Debra Winger talks with Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, before heading onstage for the Addiction Performance Project.

Actress Debra Winger is in Washington, D.C. this weekend to help educate health care providers through the Addiction Performance Project, which aims to promote drug abuse screening at the doctor's office.

Today, members of the American Psychological Association can attend a reading of the play "Long Day's Journey Into Night," which depicts a family struggling with addiction.

Debra Winger plays a woman in denial about her morphine dependence.

Dr. Paul Christo, who works at Johns Hopkins Hospital, spoke after Friday's performance. He says addiction can happen to anyone, including other doctors he's known.

"It really can destroy them as a person and lead to a huge amount of loneliness," says Christo.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates only 11 percent of addicts seek medical treatment.

NPR

'Cruel Beautiful World' Was Inspired By Two Haunting Relationships

Before novelist Caroline Leavitt started dating a controlling boyfriend, she had tragically lost a friend to one. She says writing her new book was "a way for me to forgive myself."
NPR

This Historian Wants You To Know The Real Story Of Southern Food

Michael Twitty wants credit given to the enslaved African-Americans who were part of Southern cuisine's creation. So he goes to places like Monticello to cook meals slaves would have eaten.
NPR

Barbershop: Trump's Comments And Latinos

Linda Chavez of the Center for Equal Opportunity, Denise Galvez of Latinas for Trump and columnist Gustavo Arellano discuss Donald Trump's week of comments about a former Miss Universe.
NPR

We May Die, But Our Tweets Can Live Forever

A new exhibit explores what people leave behind online after they die. BuzzFeed senior writer Doree Shafrir discusses what it was like to attend her own "digital funeral."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.