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The Arc Of Greater PW County Looks To Expand

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The Arc of Greater Prince William County, a nonprofit providing care for developmentally and physically disabled citizens, says it needs to expand to meet growing community needs.

As Chris Caseman tours the Arc of Greater Prince William County's current headquarters, he has to squeeze by the wheelchairs lined up outside a room where teenagers served by Arc are watching a movie. In the current building, Caseman says hallways have become storage spaces.

"Well, we have two and three people in each office," he says. "We've been in this particular facility for 22 years, we've added lots and lots of staff, new programs, in this location it just doesn't work anymore."

The group would like to gut the current building and move administrative offices into a new facility, a shift with a total price tag of 3.5 million.

So far, Caseman says only $200,000 has been raised, but county board chair Corey Stewart says if the Arc can raise private dollars, the county should be able to help out as well.

"I think we should be able to provide matching funds, if not this year, than in the next couple of years," Stewart says.

The Arc serves 1,700 clients each year, but Caseman says that number has been rising as the county's population continues rapid growth.


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