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D.C. Leaders Eye No. 1 Slot in Green Power Competition

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Katherine Limon uses wind power to support her store.
Jessica Gould
Katherine Limon uses wind power to support her store.

D.C. is currently number one on the Environmental Protection Agency's list of Green Power Communities. And District officials say they want city residents to join the fight to keep it that way.

Katherine Limon owns a boutique in Woodley Park called Carbon. And that's not just a name. It's a philosophy.

"I like to think of it that I'm reducing your carbon footprint by offering you a product that was sustainably made," says Limon.

So, in addition to selling dresses made of organic cotton, Limon uses sustainable energy in her shop.

"Every time I turn on my lights and the computer, I'm 100 percent wind-power generated through the Washington Gas energy saver program," she says. "I recycle everything under the sun."

D.C. Department of the Environment director Christophe Tulou says these kinds of efforts have helped make the District a standout in the EPA’s Green Power Communities Challenge. The competition ranks cities according to their use of power from renewable sources such as solar, wind, and geothermal.

"As of right now, Washington, D.C. is maintaining its lead," says Tulou. "We are still the highest amount of green purchase power in the country."

But, he says, other cities could be catching up.

"Who knows who's out there and want to get into the fray. We expect some other cities like Boston and Philadelphia might get into the competition."

So Tulou is urging more residents and businesses to sign up for green power through their local utilities

"We like a good fight.," Tulou says.

The contest runs until September 1.

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