D.C. Offers 'Safe Surrender' Days For People With Outstanding Warrants | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Offers 'Safe Surrender' Days For People With Outstanding Warrants

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Police officers in Prince George's County and Montgomery County were recognized Aug. 2 for their enforcement of gun laws under Project Exile, which allows local, state, and federal agencies to cooperate on gun crimes.
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Police officers in Prince George's County and Montgomery County were recognized Aug. 2 for their enforcement of gun laws under Project Exile, which allows local, state, and federal agencies to cooperate on gun crimes.

The District is offering fugitives with outstanding warrants for non-violent crimes the chance to turn themselves in during the city's "Safe Surrender" program later this month.

The program gives people wanted for non-violent felonies and misdemeanors the opportunity to surrender in a safe, secure fashion at D.C. Superior Court and avoid being arrested during a routine traffic stop or in front of family and children.

Also, prosecutors and judges may be inclined to look more favorably on people who voluntarily turn themselves in. During the last "Safe Surrender" in 2007, nearly 500 fugitives showed up and all but ten returned home that same day.

Law enforcement officials support the program because pursuing fugitives can be dangerous, time consuming, and costly.

Approximately 12,000 people have outstanding warrants under D.C.'s jurisdiction, according to a D.C. Courts spokeswoman.

The "Safe Surrender" program will take place on three Saturdays this month: Aug. 13, Aug. 17, and Aug. 24.

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