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Virginia County Fair Exhibitors Work To Keep Animals Cool

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Jennifer Caton is one of the owners of the Bar-C Ranch petting zoo, which is showing off all kinds of animals at the fair. One popular attraction is the camel ride.

Seven-year-old Eli has had people on his back all day, and right now, Caton is hosing down his legs.

"They have a lot of vascular tissue up in their thighs, and so when you wash down their legs the evaporation helps cool them off," says Caton. "They'll pee on their own legs in the summertime to help themselves stay cool."

Luke Falconer, vice president of the fair, is keeping an eye on the dozens of Hampshire pigs being auctioned off by the Loudoun 4-H Club. Pigs can't sweat, so for them, keeping cool is a lot tougher.

"So when people say sweating like a pig," says Falconer. "No not really."

Fair organizers say the turnout this week has been good. Although the bigger crowds don't show up until after 6 p.m. when the rides open up.

Mary Coate braved the mid-day sun today to bring her 4-year-old niece to the fair for the first time.

"It's good," she says. "I just wish it wasn't so darn hot."

Organizers are expecting a big day tomorrow, no matter what the temperature. Carnival rides open at 1 p.m.


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