Pay-By-Phone Parking Now Available At All D.C. Meters | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Pay-By-Phone Parking Now Available At All D.C. Meters

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D.C. recently added a pay-by-phone option to all of the District's 17,000 parking meters.
Rebecca Cooper
D.C. recently added a pay-by-phone option to all of the District's 17,000 parking meters.

It's finally safe to leave the quarters at home.

Mayor Vincent Gray says drivers will now be able to use their cell phones to pay for parking at all of the Districts 17,000 metered spaces.

You know I remember talking many times about people who have had to walk around with rolls of quarters to feed the meter," says Gray. "But that day is gone."

Pay-by-phone parking started as a pilot program and it's been a huge success. More than 40,000 people have already signed up.

Albert Bogaard is CEO of Parkmobile USA, the company behind the program.

"In short, you call an 800 number, use your cell-phone, you put in the zone number you see on the side and you're done for parking," says Bogaard. "Or you use a mobile app you enter the zone number, you start your parking and your done.

There is cost for the convenience, though each transaction comes with a thirty-two cents fee. For those who are more traditional, the meters will still accept quarters and other coins.

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