WAMU 88.5 : News

Awaiting Federal Funds, BRAC Road Upgrades In Bethesda Continue With State Money

Play associated audio

Eventually, the intersections at Rockville Pike and Cedar Lane, Connecticut Avenue and Jones Bridge Road, and Rockville Pike and Jones Bridge Road will all see newer and wider lanes.

The highway administration has decided to start accepting contract bids for the first portions of all those upgrades, banking on the idea that it will later receive reimbursement from the federal government.

The initial projects, which mostly revolve around moving utility lines and pipes, will cost about $11 million, and are scheduled to be completed by next winter.

A spokeswoman for the Maryland highways agency says the risk they will not receive federal funding is small.

Under the Department of Defense's Base Realignment and Closure scheme, Walter Reed Army Medical Center will close](http://wamu.org/news/11/07/27/walterreedlowersflagon102yearoldhospital.php) and be merged with the naval hospital, adding around 2,500 employees to these already very busy and congested roads.

Intersections to get improvements first near Bethesda naval medical center are marked in red.
View Constructions on Intersections near WRNMMC. in a larger map
NPR

'Game Of Thrones' Evolves On Women In Explosive Sixth Season

The sixth season of HBO's Game of Thrones showed a real evolution in the way the show portrays women and in the season finale, several female characters ascended to power. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Glen Weldon from NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour and Greta Johnsen, host of the Nerdette podcast, about the show.
NPR

In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

Perdue Farms, one of the largest poultry companies in the country, says it will change its slaughter methods and also some of its poultry houses. Animal welfare groups are cheering.
WAMU 88.5

Jonathan Rauch On How American Politics Went Insane

Party insiders and backroom deals: One author on why we need to bring back old-time politics.

WAMU 88.5

Episode 5: Why 1986 Still Matters

In 1986, a federal official issued a warning: If Metro continued to expand rapidly, the system faced a future of stark choices over maintaining existing infrastructure. Metro chose expansion. We talk to a historian about that decision. We also hear from a former Metro general manager about the following years, and from an Arlington planner about measuring how riders are responding to SafeTrack.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.