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Awaiting Federal Funds, BRAC Road Upgrades In Bethesda Continue With State Money

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Eventually, the intersections at Rockville Pike and Cedar Lane, Connecticut Avenue and Jones Bridge Road, and Rockville Pike and Jones Bridge Road will all see newer and wider lanes.

The highway administration has decided to start accepting contract bids for the first portions of all those upgrades, banking on the idea that it will later receive reimbursement from the federal government.

The initial projects, which mostly revolve around moving utility lines and pipes, will cost about $11 million, and are scheduled to be completed by next winter.

A spokeswoman for the Maryland highways agency says the risk they will not receive federal funding is small.

Under the Department of Defense's Base Realignment and Closure scheme, Walter Reed Army Medical Center will close](http://wamu.org/news/11/07/27/walterreedlowersflagon102yearoldhospital.php) and be merged with the naval hospital, adding around 2,500 employees to these already very busy and congested roads.

Intersections to get improvements first near Bethesda naval medical center are marked in red.
View Constructions on Intersections near WRNMMC. in a larger map

Making Art Off The Grid: A Month-Long Residency At A Remote National Park

Filmmakers Carter McCormick and Paula Sprenger recently wrapped up a month as artists-in-residence at Dry Tortugas National Park, 70 miles west of Key West. No phone, TV, Internet or other people.

After A Long Day Of Fighting Climate Change, This Grain Is Ready For A Beer

Kernza is a kind of grassy wheat that traps more carbon in the soil than crops like wheat and rice. Now, a West Coast brewery is using the grain in its new beer called Long Root Ale.

As Democrats Eye Senate Control, GOP Likely To Hold Slim House Majority

Democrats need a wave election to win the 30 seats they need to flip the House. But even with Hillary Clinton gaining in polls, Republicans are likely to hold onto their House majority, albeit a slimmer one.

Google Fiber Won't Accept Any New Cities For Its Superfast Internet Network

Google says it will honor its existing commitments to support or deploy gigabit-speed Internet. But it's scaling back the work on fiber optics to focus on "new technology and deployment methods."

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