WAMU 88.5 : News

Poultry Waste Having Negative Impact On Local Waterways

Play associated audio

Chicken consumption has more than doubled since the 1970s, according to a new study by the Pew Environment Group.

But the report says the manure produced by all those chickens can seep into waterways, fostering algae blooms and oxygen-deprived dead zones.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation says this is especially true of chicken farms in Delaware, Virginia and Pennsylvania. The study recommends capping the number of chickens at farms if farmers can't find methods to deal with their waste.

But poultry producers say they're already taking significant steps to improve the industry's environmental impact. They also point out the waste is full of nutrients that are good for crops.

NPR

A 24-Year-Old Designed A Self-Driving Minibus; Maker Built It In Weeks

What if cars weren't mass produced? Local Motors, a small-batch auto manufacturer, relies on an online design community and a "co-creation" business model to bring new vehicles to market, really fast.
WAMU 88.5

How History Influences Diets In D.C. And Around The World

Kojo and chef Pati Jinich look at how history -- and famous names like El Chico, Azteca and even Fritos -- shaped modern Mexican-American cooking in the Washington region and beyond.

NPR

NPR Politics Lunchbox: Concerns in Cleveland, 'Funny-Looking People'

Our favorite 2016 news and stories curated from NPR and around the web.
NPR

Facebook Shakes Up News Feed, But We Still Don't Know Exactly How It Works

It will now prioritize posts from friends and family — potentially bad news for media companies relying on Facebook for traffic. The company has been under pressure to defend its political neutrality.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.