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Nats' Top Prospect Harper Draws A Crowd In Bowie

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The Nationals top prospect Bryce Harper has been drawing crowds in Bowie, Md., but he is not feeling the pressure.
Scott Ableman (http://www.flickr.com/photos/ableman/5575285823/)
The Nationals top prospect Bryce Harper has been drawing crowds in Bowie, Md., but he is not feeling the pressure.

The former first overall pick in the MLB draft is bringing a lot of hype to a ballpark close to his eventual Major League home.

Ask the fans in the stands why they've come to Prince George's Stadium, and you're likely to get one response: Bryce Harper.

But for the eighteen-year-old phenom, making his way through the Nationals'farm system, it's business as usual. Harper has handled high expectations ever since he appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated at 16. He does his best to make sure the hype doesn't get to him.

"Ain't got no pressure. There's no pressure at all,"says Harper.

But fans say they're looking for something special.

"He's the next Mickey Mantle,"says one fan.

Another fan has more short-term expectations,

"I'm kinda thinkin three dingers."

Harper and the Senators lead the series against the Baysox 1-0.

The next game is tonight at 7:05.

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