WAMU 88.5 : News

Volunteers Gather To Beautify Arlington National Cemetery

Play associated audio
Hundreds of volunteers are heading to Arlington Cemetery today to do supplemental landscaping work to beautify the military burial ground.
Pete Thompson
Hundreds of volunteers are heading to Arlington Cemetery today to do supplemental landscaping work to beautify the military burial ground.

This event is put on by Planet, a green organization who says they want this community service project to be a gift to the American people.

Organizer Jerry Grossi says they expect to have about 400 volunteers this morning at Arlington National Cemetery, where they will do approximately $200,000 dollars worth of landscaping work.

That includes lyming, mulching, pruning, planting, and installing an irrigation system.

"We're doing a lot of projects that Arlington would normally not do," says Grossi. "These projects are expensive, and we want to donate them to Arlington."

The group is donating approximately $200,000 worth of services including liming, planting, and mulching.

Former Army Corporal Jeff McCory volunteered after serving seven tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. "I have a friends who have family buried here, so it's sort of a tribute to them," he says. "You never appreciate life until the option of it not being there is in front of you."

Hundreds of volunteers with the group are also expected to be on Capitol Hill tomorrow morning to discuss the project and other environmental issues.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
NPR

At The Democratic Convention, Choreographing A Sea Of Signs

Watch even a few minutes of the Democratic National Convention, and you're bound to see some synchronized sign-holding — with brightly colored slogans like "Stronger Together" waving in the crowd.
NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.