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D.C.'s Lone Gun Dealer To Rent Space At Police HQ

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After going several months without a working gun dealer, the city struck a compromise this week by offering bargain office space in police headquarters to the one dealer licensed in the city.
Pete Thompson
After going several months without a working gun dealer, the city struck a compromise this week by offering bargain office space in police headquarters to the one dealer licensed in the city.

The city's lone gun dealer, Charles Sykes, lost his lease in April, and because of tough zoning restrictions, he has been unable to find a new place for his business.

As a result, city residents have had no legal way to buy a handgun and bring it home for the past few months. The issue was quickly becoming a big headache for lawmakers because of the 2008 Supreme Court decision overturning the District's handgun ban.

District officials feared that if they didn't act soon, Congress would.

D.C. appears to have solved the problem by allowing Sykes to rent space at police headquarters. D.C.'s Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Paul Quander says the move will actually streamline the process...

"MPD can do the test firing, they can do the registration, people can bring in the certificates ... they can facilitate the process," Quander says.

The cost of renting at MPD headquarters? $100 per month -- not bad for commercial office space in the heart of downtown D.C. Meanwhile, Quander says a lawsuit against D.C. by several residents for its restrictive gun policies has been dismissed, in part because of this new agreement.

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