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Burglaries Continue To Rise In Montgomery County

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Burglaries have risen around 10 percent this year, an increase similar to those of previous years.

Montgomery County police chief Thomas Manger says burglaries are far less common across the river in Fairfax County, a jurisdiction very similar to Montgomery County. Manger says a major reason for the difference is sentences for burglary are much longer and heftier in Virginia than in Maryland.

"We make a compelling case, and we take it to Annapolis every year," says Manger. "And the response we get is if you're talking about more people going to jail and staying in prison longer, that comes at a cost. We don't have the money."

Manger cited one case where they believe a man, who was charged with 20 burglaries, was also responsible for around 30 more, received just an 18-month sentence after his conviction. Manger says he has no doubt the man will rob more homes and businesses when he's released.

Bethesda has become a popular target for burglars in recent months according to police, who say residents there need to do a better job of locking doors and windows when they are away at work during the day.

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