Don't Feed Metro's Escalators With Flip-Flops | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Don't Feed Metro's Escalators With Flip-Flops

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Every year approximately three dozen flip-flops are "eaten up" by escalators.
Valina Lim
Every year approximately three dozen flip-flops are "eaten up" by escalators.

Yes they're hungry, Metro staff warns of escalators, but they have highly specific dietary needs and shoes have no nutritional value. Neither do the keys or cell phones that are sometimes dropped by riders -- but flip-flops are the equivalent of junk food.

"If someone makes it to the top or the bottom of the escalator where the yellow comb plate is located and they don't lift their feet, the comb plate will lift up as it's designed to do and the shoe will end up in the machine," says Dan Stessel, a Metro spokesperson.

Stessel says when this happens the escalators will stop but that could be still be dangerous for others who aren't holding on.

"We don't want to see anyone get hurt, get cut feet but we also want to protect the people riding on the escalator," he says.

Metro also reminds people to 'keep your feet away from the edges' and to 'raise your feet as you step off and on' the escalators.

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