WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Roger Clemens Trial: Judge Declares Mistrial

Play associated audio
A judge declared a mistrial in the perjury trial of former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens on July 14.
Dennis Yang (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dennis/619791646/)
A judge declared a mistrial in the perjury trial of former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens on July 14.

Clemens is on trial for perjury in relation to his 2008 testimony before Congress in which he said he never used performance enhancing drugs. The prosecution is claiming that was a lie.

U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton scolded prosecutors this morning for twice violating his orders not to reveal certain evidence to the jury that could put the whole case at risk.

The judge reportedly interrupted the prosecution's playing of a video of Clemens' 2008 testimony before a House of Representatives committee and ordered the jury removed from the courtroom, saying he couldn't "un-ring that bell."

Walton is expected to rule on a motion on whether another trial would constitute double jeopardy later this summer. The prosecution has until July 29 to file that motion, ESPN.com reports.

NPR

Can Donald Trump Build A Campaign To Last?

Veteran strategists say while Trump has staffed up in early states, the Republican is missing the long-term campaign infrastructure and approach to go the distance.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

NPR

Can Donald Trump Build A Campaign To Last?

Veteran strategists say while Trump has staffed up in early states, the Republican is missing the long-term campaign infrastructure and approach to go the distance.
NPR

Texting While Walking: Are You Cautious Or Clueless?

People who text while walking change their pace and seem to walk more cautiously, a study says. But that doesn't mean you're not a menace to yourself and others.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.