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Congresswomen Write Obama On Entitlement Programs

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With lawmakers looking to cut trillions of dollars from the federal budget, members of both political parties are debating whether to change entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security.

Maryland Rep. Donna Edwards (D) says not so fast. She joined all of her female Democratic colleagues in sending President Obama a letter pointing out that changing entitlements will have the biggest impact on women.

"Social Security is their security, Social Security is their groceries, it is their day-to-day expenses, so it's not an option," says Edwards.

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D) says women in the District would be hit especially hard by any cuts to the programs.

"Social Security and Medicaid, as it turns out, are women's issues," Holmes says. "Yes, they affect everybody, but because women live longer, have lower incomes, do not have pensions. They are disproportionately affected, especially in the District of Columbia."

President Obama and Republicans have been discussing changing these programs during negotiations to raise the federal debt limit.

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