Firefighters Respond To Dozens Of Health Calls During Heat Wave | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Firefighters Respond To Dozens Of Health Calls During Heat Wave

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Firefighters say heat aggravates existing health problems in addition to heat related maladies
Armando Trull
Firefighters say heat aggravates existing health problems in addition to heat related maladies

The men and women of "the midnight express" -- as the Engine Company 16th near the White House is known -- have been busy today. As the temperature climbs, so does the number of calls.

Not only do the high temperatures cause heat strokes; D.C. Fire Department Lieutenant Dan Doogan says the heat also triggers existing health problems.

"People that have other illnesses and stuff you end up going for that illness but its been kicked off because of the heat," Doogan says.

And Doogan says it's not just people who are suffering from the region's high temperatures. The heat also gums up machinery.

"One that we just came from was an A/C unit on the pool level of the hotel, and it essentially did a slow melt," he says.

Doogan has just one word for anyone venturing out today and that includes his firefighters: "Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate," he says.

The action is expected to pick up even more in the later hours of the afternoon and early evening.

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