University of Maryland Students Look For Watershed Moment at Solar Decathlon | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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University of Maryland Students Look For Watershed Moment at Solar Decathlon

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Students at the University of Maryland building wetlands to prevent runoff, and purify water.
Jessica Gould
Students at the University of Maryland building wetlands to prevent runoff, and purify water.

Their project is to build a solar-powered house that includes dehumidifying waterfalls, and wetlands to prevent runoffs and purify water.

"The world is facing a possible water crisis in the future," says project architect Leah Davies. "So the house really aims to educate people that there are better practices of how to use less water."

"The Solar Decathlon typically calls for design strategies dealing with energy consumption, ways to create energy from the sun using solar panels, things like that," says Davies. "But WaterShed really wanted to look at another big global issue, which is water consumption. Sustainability's not just about individual pieces being added on to a house, it's really about designing with the climate you’re in."

Call it a Watershed moment.

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