Power Plant Generating Dangerous Emissions Over Potomac River | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Power Plant Generating Dangerous Emissions Over Potomac River

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Volunteers from the Sierra Club protested in front of GenOn's 62-year-old power plant, advocating for stronger protections against soot and smog. The plant is now said to be causing dangerous emissions over the Potomac River.
Pete Thompson
Volunteers from the Sierra Club protested in front of GenOn's 62-year-old power plant, advocating for stronger protections against soot and smog. The plant is now said to be causing dangerous emissions over the Potomac River.

Mayor Vince Gray has formally expressed his concern about this issue in a press release. The sulfur dioxide emissions have been known to cause numerous respiratory conditions, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Even just short-term exposure, like five minutes, can seriously exacerbate pre-existing conditions, such as bronchial restrictions and increased asthma symptoms.

A week ago, volunteers from the Sierra Club were out protesting in front of that power generating station. The 62-year-old station is owned by GenOn Energy Incorporated, and the organizers were collecting signatures to shut the plant down.

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