Experts Suggest Stronger Efforts To Combat Obesity In D.C. Area | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Experts Suggest Stronger Efforts To Combat Obesity In D.C. Area

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The report "F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future" ranks states and District of Columbia on the obesity scale. Maryland is the 26th most obese state, Virginia is 30th and the District is 50th. But in all three, the percentage of adults who are obese is around the 25 percent mark.

Jeff Levi heads Trust for America's Health, the organization that co-authored the report. He says D.C does have policies in place especially in schools that could help, such as meal standards that are stricter than federal requirements and limited vending machines. But he says that's just the first step.

"We certainly have done more than both Maryland and Virginia have done," he says. "And certainly a lot of pieces of policies are in place. What's hard to judge is how well they are being implemented. So every state has a physical education requirement. How effectively those get implemented will vary on a school-by-school basis."

Rates of diabetes and hypertension have increased significantly in all three jurisdictions.

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