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Bullying Top Concern for Va. Public School Students

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A survey released by Virginia's public schools this week showed that bullying was the number one concern for students at all grade levels in the state in 2010.
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A survey released by Virginia's public schools this week showed that bullying was the number one concern for students at all grade levels in the state in 2010.

Among the 737 elementary, middle and high schools that gave students anonymous safety surveys, bullying emerged as students' main concern at all grade levels.

The Virginia School Safety Survey also found that 89 percent of schools employ automated electronic-alert systems to notify families about school emergencies.

A large majority of schools, 87 percent, also reported that aside from the main doors, all exterior entrances to their buildings are locked during school hours.

State law requires an annual audit of school safety issues. The information helps shape safety practices, threat assessment and prevention policies.

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