Washington Blade Archiving Decades Of Gay Rights History In Photos | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Washington Blade Archiving Decades Of Gay Rights History In Photos

Play associated audio
The disagreement over the Dulles Airport Metro station centers over whether it will be above ground (in the area of grass and trees in the foreground of the picture above) or underneath the parking lot.
David Schultz
The disagreement over the Dulles Airport Metro station centers over whether it will be above ground (in the area of grass and trees in the foreground of the picture above) or underneath the parking lot.

Blade Editor Kevin Naff says staff members have just begun the process of digitally archiving all those images to preserve them. He says there are joyful photos of early pride celebrations in the '70s as well as more serious ones.

"There's one of a gay man who had died of AIDS and activists carried his open casket to the White House," he says. "Those photos are very powerful."

Naff says these images are important historical documents.

"The early days of the gay rights movements in Washington were ignored by the mainstream media," Naff says. "So in many cases the images we have are the only images that exist."

Naff says he hopes to complete the project this fall, and then they will begin digitally archiving their print editions.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 18

You can attend an annual Latin American film festival or see a new play about strength, war and family.

NPR

From Coffee To Chicory To Beer, 'Bitter' Flavor Can Be Addictive

If you don't think you like bitter foods, try them again. Jennifer McLagan, the author of Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, is on a mission to change hearts and minds.
NPR

Ukraine's Poroshenko Thanks Congress For Supporting Freedom

Petro Poroshenko arrives in the U.S. to meet with the president and others to lobby for increased aid to his embattled government.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.