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Even A Parade Can't Stay Politics-Free In D.C.

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A marching band provides entertainment at the Palisades Parade July 4 in Northwest D.C.
Patrick Madden
A marching band provides entertainment at the Palisades Parade July 4 in Northwest D.C.

With marching bands, a sea of American flags, and local politicians tossing candy to kids, the Palisades Parade has the look and feel of the quintessential, small-town parade.

But this is D.C. after all, where local politics is a partisan sport, and today’s parade reflected that.

There was a contingent of D.C. Republicans in the march calling for the resignation of a council member. There was a group of neighbors protesting a local university's development plan. And later on, another marcher protested the city's online gambling proposal, followed right behind the Council member who authored the deal.

If all politics is local, you might say all parades, at least in D.C., are political.

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