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Rehoboth and Dewey Beaches' Waters Get Superstar Ratings

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The Natural Resources Defense Council named Rehoboth and Dewey beaches 'superstars' in a recent water quality rating.
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The Natural Resources Defense Council named Rehoboth and Dewey beaches 'superstars' in a recent water quality rating.

The annual report from the Natural Resources Defense Council rates the water quality of the nation's top 200 beach destinations. The report looks at data gathered by the federal Environmental Protection Agency that gauges acceptable bacteria levels, as well as the number of closings and advisories over the course of the year.

In addition to the superstar status given to Rehoboth and Dewey in coastal Delaware, both Ocean City and Assateague Island in Maryland got high marks, each earning a perfect five star rating.

But overall, the study shows that water quality at beaches across the country is on the decline as pollution from stormwater runoff and sewage overflows are plaguing America's beaches.

Last year saw the second highest number of closings and advisory days at the nation's beaches in more than two decades.

Local officials in Dewey, Rehoboth, and Ocean City say the report gives people yet another reason to come to the region for their summer vacation.

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