New Drunk Driving Law Extends Suspension, Raises Offense For Teens | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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New Drunk Driving Law Extends Suspension, Raises Offense For Teens

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The law doubles the suspension period for anyone in Virginia under the age of 21 found driving with a blood alcohol level of at .02. It also elevates the offense to a class one misdemeanor.

Kurt Erickson, president of the Washington Regional Alcohol Program, says that penalty sends a message.

"You're not only going to be guilty of a class one misdemeanor in Virginia, you're going to lose your license for a year," he says. "That's not up to a year, that's a year minimum."

Laura Dawson, who lost her son to a drunk driving accident in 1999, is strongly supportive of the new law, but says laws can only do so much without increased awareness of the dangers of drunk driving.

"We're always supportive of law enforcement being able to do their jobs, but there's never going to be enough laws to stop everything," she says.

The law isn't entirely new to Virginia. Identical legislation took effect in 2008, but had a two year sunset provision. The new version is permanent.

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