After Shooting Near Caribbean Parade, Group Says Funds Are Needed To Fight Gangs | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

After Shooting Near Caribbean Parade, Group Says Funds Are Needed To Fight Gangs

Play associated audio
Organizers with the group Peaceaholics press for city funds to stop gang violence at the scene of Saturday's shooting.
Patrick Madden
Organizers with the group Peaceaholics press for city funds to stop gang violence at the scene of Saturday's shooting.

Police are blaming the shooting, which also injured other three people, on gang violence.

Hours before Terry Jiminez was arraigned in court on murder charges, Ron Moten and other organizers with the gang-prevention group the Peaceaholics were out at the scene of the shooting, criticizing city officials for cutting the organization's budget.

"We want to come together and do what we teach these children do: Put aside your differences and do what's best for our community," Moten says.

D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier says she welcomes anyone who wants to help prevent gang violence.

"If others want to jump in volunteer to help us out, we would be happy to have them," says Lanier.

But when pressed if these groups should be paid for their efforts, she declined to answer.

NPR

Ed Norton On 'Birdman,' Wes Anderson And Why $40 Makes Him Proud

Making Birdman "was one of the most creatively satisfying experiences I've had," Norton says. He also talks about why Anderson's films are deep and getting royalties for the music in Death to Smoochy.
NPR

From NFL to 'Scandal,' Whole Foods Buys TV Ads To Boost Its Brand

A pioneer in selling organic, sustainable groceries, Whole Foods now finds itself beset by competitors. So it's launching its first national ad blitz to sell socially conscious consumers on its story.
NPR

In Tight Races, Both Parties Bank On Early Votes

Two million people have already voted in next month's election, including President Obama. Locking in votes early is huge, particularly since control of the Senate rests in a handful of close races.
NPR

Who's Catching Your Cellphone Conversations?

The police do it. The FBI does it. Could be, foreign governments do it. With the right equipment, people can hijack your cellphone calls and texts and listen in.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.