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TSA Considers Enabling Faster Security Screening At Airports

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A new survey shows that a large number of frequent business and leisure travelers would pay up to $150 dollars to enroll in a trusted traveler program that would allow faster screening processes at airport security checkpoints.
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A new survey shows that a large number of frequent business and leisure travelers would pay up to $150 dollars to enroll in a trusted traveler program that would allow faster screening processes at airport security checkpoints.

A new survey shows that a large number of frequent business and leisure travelers would pay up to $150 dollars to enroll in a trusted traveler program that would allow faster screening processes at airport security checkpoints.

According to the U.S. Travel Association, this idea would be called a Trusted Traveler Program, and the way it would work is that the person would pay between a $100 and $150 dollars for an annual enrollment fee.

That person would undergo a background check, and if approved, the person would enjoy faster screening processes at the airport. According to a survey, 45 percent of all travelers would be very likely to somewhat likely to enroll in such a program. But for business travelers, that number jumps to 75 percent.

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