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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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The Reduced Shakespeare Company rips Hollywood to pieces at the Kennedy Center.
http://www.reducedshakespeare.com/
The Reduced Shakespeare Company rips Hollywood to pieces at the Kennedy Center.

(June 28-July 3) 187 movies in 100 minutes

The Reduced Shakespeare Company condenses 187 films into 100 minutes of farcical shtick in "Completely Hollywood" (abridged). Blockbuster clichés are rolled into comical combinations like Robert DeNiro and Jessica Tandy in Taxi Driving Miss Daisy through Sunday at the Kennedy Center.

(June 27-Aug. 4) Rocking in Fort Reno

The District's annual Fort Reno summer concert series gets underway Monday. Local rock bands make the most pleasant noise possible at Fort Reno Park in Tenleytown every Monday and Thursday evening through early August. Monday it's mostly a punk affair with Washington's Beasts Of No Nation and Railsplitter and the softer pop sounds of Arlington's Valley Tours.

(June 27-July 9) Crafty collection

The Mansion at Strathmore has nearly 200 crafty pieces made by crack contemporary artisans through early July. The Creative Crafts Council exhibition showcases the region's functional and decorative works in glass, clay, metal, wood and more.

Music: "Also Sprach Zarathustra" by Deodato

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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