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Affidavit Says DNA Evidence Links Landeros To AU Professor's Murder

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Montgomery County Police are seeking to arrest Jorge Rueda Landeros in connection with the killing of American University Professor Sue Ann Marcum in October 2010.
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Montgomery County Police are seeking to arrest Jorge Rueda Landeros in connection with the killing of American University Professor Sue Ann Marcum in October 2010.

In the complaint affidavit obtained by WAMU, investigators say 41-year-old Jorge Landeros is currently living in Juarez, Mexico, to avoid prosecution as a suspect in the murder of American University accounting professor Sue Marcum. Marcum was found murdered in her Glen Echo home in October.

According to the complaint, detectives gathered DNA evidence from that crime scene, including samples forensic investigators say did not belong to Marcum.

Later, investigators discovered Landeros, who was now in Mexico and communicating with police through email, was occasionally crossing the border to visit family. Montgomery County Police detectives ordered border patrol to stop Landeros on his next trip to Texas and take a DNA sample from him. That sample matched DNA found on the murder weapon in Marcum's home. The next day Landeros was charged with first-degree murder.

Federal authorities say Landeros continues to communicate with them via email, insisting he's not guilty, and refusing to turn himself in.

Complaint Affidavit: Jorge Rueda Landeros
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