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Researchers In Virginia Seek More Funding For Biomedical Studies

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Researchers say they are on the verge of making significant progress in treating certain diseases, but in order to achieve the results, they need more funding from the state, which is already cash-strapped.

The breakthroughs are on several fronts, according to Brien Riley, the associate professor of Psychiatry and Human Molecular Genetics at Virginia Commonwealth University.

He told the Senate Finance Committee that although researchers in other states are studying treatments for Type 2 diabetes, VCU is laying the groundwork that will help treatment become a reality much sooner. He also says after many years, they've found factors attributed to some mental disorders.

"We've also partnered more recently with the toxicology and pharmacology departments at VCU to begin a really unique center studying alcohol and other substance dependence," says Riley.

Another study he says will revolutionize medicine is discovering what makes a donor recipient accept or reject a transplant organ. Riley says they've made significant strides, but if they don't get more operational funding soon, their research will be for naught.

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