Frederick Schools, Parents Fight Over Banning Textbook | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Frederick Schools, Parents Fight Over Banning Textbook

Play associated audio
The book that has some Frederick County Schools parents up in arms, Social Studies Alive.
Elliott Francis
The book that has some Frederick County Schools parents up in arms, Social Studies Alive.

The board is still weighing its options in the disagreement over the third grade social studies textbook, which some parents say is promoting a liberal agenda. They did agree to form a task force at their June 22 board meeting to look into the issue.

The Frederick County school board discussed the matter Wednesday evening with a small group of parents who want the book Social Studies Alive removed from the curriculum. The parents say portions of the text are slanted, offering leading questions about socialist ideology.

Frederick County resident Cindy Rose, who filed the original formal complaint with the board, gives an example from the textbook.

"It's hard for parents to work, it's even harder if they have children, so wouldn't it be a good idea -- and that's how its posed -- if there were free child care for all?" she says. "That to me is not something you teach a 3rd grader."

The discussion went on for three hours. While some of the seven members of the board appeared to agree with Rose's characterization, one member, Angie Fish, disagreed and says the questions engage students.

"I want them to have those critical thinking skills to make those decisions for them," she says. "Rather than me spoon feeding them what I want them to do for the rest of their lives."

But another member, James Reeder, disagreed, and while speaking to a supporter of the text, pointed to one of the disputed lessons.

"When you ask the question do you think its good to provide health care for free or however it was constructed, you are deliberately leading these kids in a certain direction," he says.

The board will form a task force to study the matter at its next meeting.

NPR

'Ghettoside' Explores Why Murders Are Invisible In Los Angeles

In her new book, journalist Jill Leovy studies the epidemic of unsolved murders in African-American neighborhoods and the relationships between police and victims' relatives, witnesses and suspects.
NPR

Tossing Out Food In The Trash? In Seattle, You'll Be Fined For That

Seattle is the first city in the nation to fine people for not properly sorting their garbage. The law took effect on Jan. 1 as a bid to keep food out of landfills and encourage composting instead.
NPR

Abortion Vote Shows How Much Democrats' World Has Changed

Of those 64 Democrats who cast a key anti-abortion vote in November 2009, only 12 remain in the House today.
WAMU 88.5

Drone Found On White House Grounds, Not Regarded As Ongoing Threat

A drone landed in a tree on the White House grounds shortly after 3 a.m. Monday morning, touching off a security response.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.