D.C. Mayor Promises Park To Red Line Crash Victims' Families | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Mayor Promises Park To Red Line Crash Victims' Families

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Evelyn Fernandez, the daughter of crash victim Ana Fernandez, breaks down as she speaks at a memorial ceremony.
David Schultz
Evelyn Fernandez, the daughter of crash victim Ana Fernandez, breaks down as she speaks at a memorial ceremony.

At a memorial service marking two years since the crash, Tawanda Brown made a request. Brown lost her daughter, Lavonda King, in the train crash and she says the families of the victims want a public park near the Fort Totten Metro station, to commemorate their loved ones.

"It is our strong desire that the children we are raising -- because of the loss of their mothers -- that they will one day have a place to go in remembrance of their mothers other than their gravesite," Brown says.

Mayor Gray was in attendance and was visibly moved. He told the victims' families, if he and the City Council can't fulfill their request, then they don't deserve to be public servants.

"And I know we can do this. If we can't do this we ought to turn in our badges," he says."

Creating a new park in D.C. is often a long bureaucratic process, but Gray promised to make it happen within one year, before the third anniversary of the crash.

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