D.C. Mayor Promises Park To Red Line Crash Victims' Families | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

D.C. Mayor Promises Park To Red Line Crash Victims' Families

Play associated audio
Evelyn Fernandez, the daughter of crash victim Ana Fernandez, breaks down as she speaks at a memorial ceremony.
David Schultz
Evelyn Fernandez, the daughter of crash victim Ana Fernandez, breaks down as she speaks at a memorial ceremony.

At a memorial service marking two years since the crash, Tawanda Brown made a request. Brown lost her daughter, Lavonda King, in the train crash and she says the families of the victims want a public park near the Fort Totten Metro station, to commemorate their loved ones.

"It is our strong desire that the children we are raising -- because of the loss of their mothers -- that they will one day have a place to go in remembrance of their mothers other than their gravesite," Brown says.

Mayor Gray was in attendance and was visibly moved. He told the victims' families, if he and the City Council can't fulfill their request, then they don't deserve to be public servants.

"And I know we can do this. If we can't do this we ought to turn in our badges," he says."

Creating a new park in D.C. is often a long bureaucratic process, but Gray promised to make it happen within one year, before the third anniversary of the crash.

NPR

Tim Gunn: On And Off The Runway, 'Life Is A Big Collaboration'

"Make it work," the fashion guru tells designers on Project Runway. But life hasn't always "worked" for Gunn. Originally broadcast on Feb. 5, 2014.
NPR

The Weird, Underappreciated World Of Plastic Packaging

So much of the food we eat these days is encased in plastic. And behind it is a whole lot of research and innovation. We dive into some of the materials that keep food fresh and portable.
NPR

In A Luxury Apartment, Is A Separate 'Poor Door' Segregation?

New York City officials approved a plan for a separate entrance for low-income residents in a luxury building. Is the decision smart economics or discrimination? The Barbershop guys weigh in.
NPR

The Weird, Underappreciated World Of Plastic Packaging

So much of the food we eat these days is encased in plastic. And behind it is a whole lot of research and innovation. We dive into some of the materials that keep food fresh and portable.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.