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D.C. Looks To Soften President's Park

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There are currently five design proposals for changes to President's Park, which has been lined with barricades since 9-11.
Pete Thompson
There are currently five design proposals for changes to President's Park, which has been lined with barricades since 9-11.

After September 11, 2001, thick, concrete barricades went up along E Street NW by President's Park south of the White House. They've been there ever since.

But the National Capital Planning Commission wants to make these security components more pleasing to the eye and is seeking public input on how to do so.

The commission has released proposals from five design firms online and at the White House Visitor Center that would revamp and beautify the park while maintaining adequate security.

Trey Barnes, who was passing by the park this morning, says he's all for a change.

"If they can have the same level of security without the in-your-face nature of barricades, I think that's a good thing," he says.

The public comment period lasts from today through Monday.

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