D.C. Council Looks To Restore Public's Confidence | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Council Looks To Restore Public's Confidence

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With the introduction of two bills by Council member Tommy Wells addressing luxury SUV's and campaign finance loopholes, and another proposed ethics reform bill by from Council member Vincent Orange, it's clear council members are trying to demonstrate action.

On June 13, Council member Mary Cheh and Chairman Kwame Brown held a hearing on their proposed ethics overhaul. Wells says the council wants to restore the public's confidence in local government.

"We've had a bad couple of weeks, and I want people to realize that we can police ourselves, we can improve our government and that our city can keep moving along on the positive track that it's been moving on," he says.

With all of the different reform bills being considered, there is the fear, raised by city's attorney general at the June 13 hearing, that creating new ethics laws will just add another layer of bureaucracy.

Attorney General Irv Nathan suggests tougher enforcement of the laws already on the books and restoring some of the power to the Attorney General's Office.

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