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New Study Urges Parents To Supervise Kids In Portable Pools

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A study being released today found that more than 200 children have died in portable pools during the past two years. Many of them were unsurpervised.
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A study being released today found that more than 200 children have died in portable pools during the past two years. Many of them were unsurpervised.

A child dies every five days in a portable pool during the summer months, according to a study being published today in the journal Pediatrics.

It shows that between 2001 and 2009, 209 children around the country died in one of these pools, with 81 percent of the incidents happening during the summer months.

Those findings were made by researchers at Nationwide Chilren's Hospital in conjunction with the firm Independent Safety Consulting based in Rockville.

They focused on portable pools, from smaller wading pools to ones that reach depths of four feet.

The study finds that children were not supervised by adults in about 43 percent of those cases. In only 15 percent of cases that resulted in death, were children given CPR before emergency crews arrived.

Experts say that demonstrates the need for more extensive CPR training among adults and affordable safety features on portable pools.

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