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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram

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Northern Virignia's Evan Reed shows his fantastical architecture off at Project 4 in Northwest Washington.
Project 4
Northern Virignia's Evan Reed shows his fantastical architecture off at Project 4 in Northwest Washington.

(June 20-July 3) First base from a historical perspective

The History of Kisses makes its world premiere at Washington’s Studio Theatre this month. Playwright David Cole’s latest effort finds a retired navy man-turned amateur shanty-writer sequestered in an oceanfront motel room. The trysts that come and go around him influence his songs and draw him in through early July in Northwest Washington.

(June 20-July 16) Traveling past Project 4?

Northwest’s Project 4 gallery showcases the work of Northern Virginia sculptor Evan Reed through mid-July. The artist recreates man’s most fantastical architectural structures and imagines a few, too.

(June 20-Jan. 1) A racy exhibition

Race has been bringing people together and tearing them apart for a good while now. The National Museum of Natural History explores why in RACE: Are We So Different? through the end of the year. The collaboration between the American Anthropological Association and the Science Museum of Minnesota looks at race and racism from biological, cultural, and historical perspectives.

Music: “Return To Hot Chicken” by Yo La Tengo

NPR

'Traveling Pants' Author Tries Traveling In Time

NPR's Petra Mayer profiles YA author Ann Brashares, whose new book The Here and Now follows a young girl and her community who've escaped a terrible future via time travel and landed in our present.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

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