Cheetah Cubs At The Smithsonian Are Healthy And Active | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Cheetah Cubs At The Smithsonian Are Healthy And Active

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One of the National Zoo's female cheetahs gave birth to five cheetah cubs, including this one, May 28.
National Zoo
One of the National Zoo's female cheetahs gave birth to five cheetah cubs, including this one, May 28.

The up-close look at the cubs was brief. Workers weighed them and took their temperatures and measurements. The staff says the cubs are doing well and are very active.

The animals were born at the facility in Front Royal, Va. May 28, and now weigh in around 2 pounds each.

Cheetahs are the fastest animals on earth, but they are in danger of becoming extinct because of hunting, and the loss of their habitats. Around 7,000 to 10,000 cheetahs are believed left in the wild.

The Smithsonian's goal is to preserve and conserve species while training humans to help.

The goal now is to monitor the cubs from afar, giving mom Amani privacy to bond with her babies.

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