Lawmakers Look To Move Past Weiner Scandal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Lawmakers Look To Move Past Weiner Scandal

Play associated audio
Anthony Weiner, who resigned from Congress Thursday, at a press conference in May.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/talkradionews/5716593223
Anthony Weiner, who resigned from Congress Thursday, at a press conference in May.

In a press conference announcing his resignation, Weiner said he was stepping down because news of lewd photos he sent to women online became too much of a “distraction.” Ruppersberger says that may be a stretch.

“It got national attention, but it didn't take away from anything that either Democrats or Republicans were focusing on of the issues of today," he says.

When Weiner acknowledged sending lewd photos to women on Twitter, Ruppersberger says he was on official business in Pakistan and had other things on his mind. But now that Weiner has resigned, Ruppersberger says he wishes him and his family the best.

“He has to deal with his own personal issues. I think he made a wise decision, so he can resolve those issues with he and his family. And then we really need to move on," he says.

Ruppersberger says national security and the debate over raising the nation's debt ceiling deserve the full attention of lawmakers and the press corps.

NPR

Edison's Talking Dolls Can Now Provide The Soundtrack To Your Nightmares

Thomas Edison built and sold about 500 dolls back in 1890. Now, new technology has made hearing their supercreepy voices possible for the first time in decades. (Thanks, technology.)
NPR

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Tibet. It's been consumed in the Himalayas for centuries and helped inspire the Bulletproof Coffee craze in the U.S.
WAMU 88.5

Maryland Democrats Pressure Gov. Hogan On Education Spending

The General Assembly has been adjourned for almost a month, but Democrats in Maryland are still pressuring Republican Gov. Larry Hogan to release funding for public education.
NPR

Edison's Talking Dolls Can Now Provide The Soundtrack To Your Nightmares

Thomas Edison built and sold about 500 dolls back in 1890. Now, new technology has made hearing their supercreepy voices possible for the first time in decades. (Thanks, technology.)

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.