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Lawmakers Look To Move Past Weiner Scandal

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Anthony Weiner, who resigned from Congress Thursday, at a press conference in May.
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Anthony Weiner, who resigned from Congress Thursday, at a press conference in May.

In a press conference announcing his resignation, Weiner said he was stepping down because news of lewd photos he sent to women online became too much of a “distraction.” Ruppersberger says that may be a stretch.

“It got national attention, but it didn't take away from anything that either Democrats or Republicans were focusing on of the issues of today," he says.

When Weiner acknowledged sending lewd photos to women on Twitter, Ruppersberger says he was on official business in Pakistan and had other things on his mind. But now that Weiner has resigned, Ruppersberger says he wishes him and his family the best.

“He has to deal with his own personal issues. I think he made a wise decision, so he can resolve those issues with he and his family. And then we really need to move on," he says.

Ruppersberger says national security and the debate over raising the nation's debt ceiling deserve the full attention of lawmakers and the press corps.

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