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New HIV/AIDS Cases In D.C. Down By Half

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The 2010 report integrated D.C. data from 2009 on HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, STDs and TB.
D.C. Department of Health
The 2010 report integrated D.C. data from 2009 on HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, STDs and TB.

New cases of HIV and AIDS decreased by nearly half over a two-year span, according to the city's latest HIV/AIDS study. The number of deaths from the disease was also down 50 percent over four years.

And doctors say people testing positive for HIV are entering into care much earlier, helping halt the virus's progression into full-blown AIDS.

Council member David Catania says the District's push for more testing and better data is clearly paying off.

"So across the board there is a lot of reasons to be optimistic but this is not the end of the road, it requires continued effort," Catania says. "It requires continued resources, but I do believe we are on the right track," says Catania.

Despite the gains, the study points out several areas of concern. HIV/AIDS continues to disproportionately affect African-Americans, particularly black men.

The study also warns of new, emerging disparities in population groups. It found that older adults and Hispanics are much more likely to be late testers -- that is, to receive a positive diagnosis long after being infected with HIV.

2010 D.C. Report on HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB
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