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Police Still Pursuing Suspect In AU Professor's Murder

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Sue Marcum, an accounting professor at American University, was found dead in her home in October.
American University
Sue Marcum, an accounting professor at American University, was found dead in her home in October.

Sue Ann Marcum, a popular accounting professor at AU, was found dead in her home last October. Last month, Maryland and international law enforcement authorities issued a warrant for an arrest in her murder, for Jorge Landeros, a former Spanish teacher and friend of Marcum's living in Mexico.

But Landeros has proclaimed his innocence in communications online and in a phone interview with the Washington Post, saying authorities want to make him a "scapegoat" for the murder.

Landeros reportedly told detectives in El Paso, Texas, that he would not come across the border to answer questions about the case; although he did invite authorities to brunch at a cafe in Juarez to discuss the case, according to the Post report.

Marcum's killing was originally thought to be a robbery gone wrong, after her car was found in the possession of an 18-year-old D.C. resident. But that person was only ever charged with unauthorized use of the vehicle.

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