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U.S. Open: For Fred Funk, One Last Major In His Hometown

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Fred Funk hits his tee shot on the second hole during the practice round at the 2011 U.S. Open at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Md. on Monday, June 13, 2011.
(Copyright USGA/Steve Gibbons)
Fred Funk hits his tee shot on the second hole during the practice round at the 2011 U.S. Open at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Md. on Monday, June 13, 2011.

Fred Funk qualified for the Open just last week at Woodmont Country Club in Rockville. After doing so, the former University of Maryland golf coach broke down in tears. It took him awhile to realize why.

"I knew if I made it, it would probably be my last chance to play a major in my home town," he says. "Because if we stay at a 14-year rotation, I'll be 68 or 69 years old next time it comes around."

Today is Funk's 55th birthday, making him the oldest golfer at this week's tournament. In addition, he's probably also the most self-deprecating.

"I grew up in College Park, but playing Congressional was taboo for a PG County guy," he says. "You just weren't allowed across the Montgomery County line without a visa. We didn't get over to this part of the world very often."

Funk does hope to play well enough to make the cut for the weekend, as his son will be his caddy, and Sunday is Father's Day.

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