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National Building Museum To Begin Charging Admission

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The Great Hall of the National Building Museum will still be open free to the public, but not much else will.
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The Great Hall of the National Building Museum will still be open free to the public, but not much else will.

The museum's cavernous great hall, as well as the museum shop and cafe, will still be free of charge for visitors. Access to all other collections and exhibits will require payment of an admission fee.

Starting July 27, the museum will charge $8 for adults, and $5 for children, students, and senior citizens. For families just hoping to visit the interactive Building Zone feature of the museum for children aged 2 to 6, the fee will be $3 per person.

The museum will also waive the entrance fee for active duty military personnel members and their families between Labor Day and Memorial Day.

The museum has been charging $5 per person for another special exhibit, LEGO Architecture, since July of 2010, but after July 27, admission to the LEGO exhibit will be included in the general admission fees, according to a museum spokesperson.

The building's management doesn't expect to charge additional entrance fees for any special exhibitions at this time, according to the spokesperson.

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